Anna Bradley (From Home)

Speaking with New York based rock band, Anna Bradley, on their growth as an organism and their experiences recording in the DIY scene:

Dingus:  Anna Bradley has a history, let’s hear it.

Anna Bradley:  Well, Anna Bradley started when my old band, Telecosmic, basically imploded, mostly because of musical differences.  I had wanted to write and sing more hooks, more melodies and that band was just not doing it for me. So I took the catchiest demos I had made on Garageband, added some megaphone distortion to the vocals, and henceforth came Anna Bradley’s debut EP, are you a young rebel?.  Ever since then, there’s been kind of a non-stop release schedule of new records, even after I left New York and only played with the band during breaks from college. We drifted into our next release, nervous, in May, with a number of different friends helping to record, playing parts, and mastering the EP which was eventually released in November. Right before I left to college, we finally got a steady rhythm section, consisting of bassist Damon Korf and drummer Dan Kolpin, and in August  we recorded and released the ‘Anna Bradley‘ single onto New Jersey-based net-label Tamur Records.  In December of 2009 we recorded our first full-length record, Pavo, with Ramur founder Connor Meara, engineering.  After a long period of mixing and mastering, it was finally released in September of 2010, with a limited physical release from Nana’s Records.  While Pavo was being mixed, our bassist Damon quit, so we replaced him with Telecosmic’s bassist, Evan-Daniel Rose-González. In November 2010, we added a second guitarist, Daniel Fisher, into the band, and self-recorded the A-side to our June 2011 single ‘Perfume‘. Then, in July, we recorded our newest EP, Your Seamless Sons, with Oliver Ignatius of Ghost Pal, which was released a couple of months ago, in the beginning of September.

It’s been an eclectic past for the band, do you think that Anna Bradley is here to stay now?

We were wondering that a little ourselves, actually.  We have had a steady line-up for what is now the longest period of the band, so we debated over whether to not continue if we couldn’t do that with all our members (which may be possible soon, especially since all of the others are going to college now/one may move away from the NYC area), but I think we all decided that Anna Bradley was just a project it felt right to be attached to, so we decided to just keep going and recorded the EP.  We actually also worked on some new songs right before I came back to California!  So it’s very much still happening.

Do any of the Anna Bradley members have side projects similar to Hooves?

Well, none of the members’ side projects are really fully fledged yet, except perhaps my California project, Injun Magic.  We’re kind of like a more psychedelic Anna Bradley, with more freaky/folky influences. Our very close friend Ken (guitarist for Hooves) was in this band Oh, Oh, Ecstasy for the summer (not anymore), and they do a really cool surf-y, Real Estate-like pop thing which I dig, a lot.

You recorded your latest work at Mama Coco’s Funky Kitchen, how was that experience?

Mama Coco’s was easily the best Anna Bradley recording experience thus far.  It was the most relaxed, fun, and band-like one we’ve done.  Oliver is one of the best engineers I’ve ever worked with, providing stellar advice, adding some great textural percussion and generally giving us the fullest, most live sounds that we’ve managed to capture thus far.  And he just keeps getting better.  He learns from his mistakes, takes time to discover how to approach each song individually with love and respect, and makes amazing choices in terms of instrumental and recording equipment.  He’s also just a really easygoing guy, somebody who makes you feel comfortable and willing to express yourself.

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